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Qajaq USA is the American Chapter of Qaannat Kattuffiat - the Greenland Kayak Association. We have members world-wide. Qajaq USA is one of only two affiliated "Qajaq" clubs outside of Greenland. Most "Qajaq" clubs are scattered among the small villages of Greenland and are a major impetus in keeping the local kayaking traditions alive.

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Home > Technique > Video Clips

Greenland Kayaking Video Clips


 

Qajaq USA is pleased to bring you the following Greenland kayaking video clips. There has been Qajaq USA Video Clipsmuch written about Greenland technique but visual confirmation has been difficult to obtain, unless, of course, you have traveled to Greenland or taken instruction from Maligiaq Padilla or another of the talented Greenland kayakers. We hope the following clips will greatly increase your understanding of Greenland kayaking techniques.

If you find a clip that you wish to view often, please save it to your machine, rather than downloading it multiple times from this page. Most media players allow you to do this under the File menu option. Doing so will save bandwidth and prevent Qajaq USA from exceeding our monthly bandwidth limit. If bandwidth issues are not a problem we will be able to add additional and longer clips.

Many of the clips are edited so that if you run them in a loop, the start and finish of the technique will approximately blend together. Click on the desired image below to view the clip.

 

Forward Stroke Techniques (long distance)

Long Distance Forward Stroke

Michael Jakobsen long distance video clip

(1.2MB mpeg) click on image to view clip.
Michael Jakobsen (Mee-kell' Yok'-ob-sen), Qajaq Aasiat, on his way to victory in the QU-2000 long distance event. Note the fluid stroke, hands generally stay below eye level and the paddle blade exits well behind the hip. Elbows are kept low and pointed downwards. Michael displays a very subtle abdominal crunch and a diagonal torso movement (like performing a sit-up and touching your elbow to the opposite knee). Footage courtesy and copyright of KNR Radio Greenland.

Long Distance Forward Stroke Oblique View

Michael Jakobsen long distance oblique view video clip

(0.5MB mpeg) click on image to view clip
Michael Jakobsen, in the same race above, shown in an oblique front-view. This footage quality is not as clear as the clip above, with much camera movement, but it provides additional clues for paddlers interested in a more "frontal" view. Note that his pushing hand often crosses over the center line. Footage courtesy and copyright of KNR Radio Greenland.

Long Distance Forward Stroke

Maligiaq Padilla long distance video clip

(0.6MB mpeg) click on image to view clip
Maligiaq Padilla (Ma-lig'-ee-ock Pa-dee'-ya) uses a strongly canted blade (top edge is tilted forward) and abdominal crunch. In this scene from the long distance race from QU-2000, he is surfing a small wave which has increased his cadence and affects his torso motion. More information on Maligiaq's paddle stroke mechanics can be found in the Qajaq USA Strokes page. Maligiaq finished second in this race. Footage courtesy and copyright of KNR Radio Greenland.

Long Distance Forward Stroke Oblique View

Maligiaq Padilla oblique view long distance video clip

(0.6MB mpeg) click on image to view clip
Maligiaq Padilla, in the same race as above shown, in an oblique front-view. This footage quality is not as clear as the clip above, with much camera movement, but it provides additional clues for paddlers interested in a more "frontal" view. Note that his pushing hand often crosses over the center line. Footage courtesy and copyright of KNR Radio Greenland.

Long Distance Forward Stroke

Piitaaraq Janussen long distance video clip

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Piitaaraq Janussen, Qajaq Paamiut, showing a very smooth stroke. His "pushing" hand rises slightly higher than many of the Greenlanders. Piitaaraq finished fourth in the QU-2000 long distance race. Footage courtesy and copyright of KNR Radio Greenland.

 

Forward Stroke Techniques (sliding stroke)

Sliding Stroke with Abdominal Crunch

Arne Nielsen sliding stroke video clip

(1.2MB mpeg) click on image to view clip
Arne Nielsen, Qajaq Uummannaq, performs a sliding stroke with a full size-paddle during the long distance race during QU-2000. Note the strong abdominal crunch that allows large muscle groups to drive the paddle through to the exit. Also note that much of the mechanics of the sliding stroke is accomplished by torso rotation. Arne finished third in this race. Footage courtesy and copyright of KNR Radio Greenland..

 

Forward Stroke Techniques (sprint stroke)

Sprint Stroke

Arne Nielsen sprint stroke

(0.7MB mpeg) click on image to view clip
Arne Nielsen, Qajaq Uummannaq, sprinting at the start of the QU-2000 short-distance race. Note the strong torso rotation and very vertical paddle. Arne's qajaq has extremely low volume and waves commonly break over its deck. Footage courtesy and copyright of KNR Radio Greenland.

Sprint Strokes

Group Sprint Video Clip

(1.5MB mpeg) click on image to view clip
A number of very different styles are evident in this clip taken during the start of the QU-2000 short-distance race. Note the strong abdominal crunch used by some of the kayakers during sprinting that is very common in Greenland. A much more subtle "crunch" is used for long distance kayaking. The paddles are generally held quite vertical for sprinting but even so the hands usually do not rise above the chin. Footage courtesy and copyright of KNR Radio Greenland.

 

Capsize Recovery Strokes

Side Sculling
(Innaqatsineq)

Side Sculling Video Clip

(1.2MB mpeg)  click on image to view clip
Maligiaq Padilla of Qajaq Sisimiut. Note that the inboard hand is slid near the end of the paddle but is not cupped around the end. Keys are to arch your back to keep the kayak from falling over on you (which would push your torso underwater) and to place pressure on your lower leg once your torso enters the water. This high-brace (palms-up) sculling position is essentially the same as for the Standard roll. Footage courtesy and copyright of KNR Radio Greenland.

Standard Roll
(Kinnguffik paarlallugu/nerfallaallugu)

Standard Roll Video Clip

(0.9MB mpeg) click on image to view clip
Kristian David Josefsen ("Ari") of Qajaq Nuuk. This is the most common roll performed in Greenland. It is an extremely powerful roll and requires with very little energy expenditure. The sweep is done in a high-brace (palms-up) position, but on recovery it is popular to move into a low brace for additional support as demonstrated in this clip. Footage courtesy and copyright of KNR Radio Greenland.

Storm Roll
(Siukkut pallortillugu/masikkut)

Storm Roll Video Clip

(1.2MB mpeg) click on image to view clip
Also see frontal view (1.0MB mpeg). Greg Stamer of Qajaq USA at ConnYak event. The storm roll is superficially similar to a C-to-C roll and works in many of the same situations. Unlike the C-to-C, the storm is a low-brace roll (your palms face the kayak during the maneuver). Your inboard hand (and paddle blade) stays in contact with the hull. This allows the (unfeathered) paddle to be levered off the hull during the hipsnap. As the name suggests this is a very useful roll for violent weather as you recover in a stable low brace, full tuck position. Footage courtesy of Jay Babina.

Reverse Sweep Roll
(Kingumut naatillugu)

Reverse Roll Video Clip

(1.0MB mpeg) click on image to view clip
Harvey Golden of Qajaq USA performing at SSTIKS. The reverse roll is also a very common roll in Greenland. Note that this roll is very different than the "Steyr" and is a low brace technique (your palms face the deck). Also note how the outboard blade is elevated during the sweep. Allowing the inclined blade to become horizontal at the time of the hipsnap, and using the buoyancy of the paddle aids in the the final recovery. This roll allows very little water to enter an open sprayskirt. Footage courtesy and copyright of Craig Beverly.

Behind the Back Roll
(Kingup apummaatigut)

Behind the Back Roll Video Clip

(1.4MB mpeg) click on image to view clip
Pavia Lumholt of Qajaq København. This is a spatially confusing roll, you may wish to start with the finish position and work backwards. Variations are with the inboard hand cupping the paddle tip (easiest), with the palm facing upward (slightly more difficult) or with the palm facing downward (much more difficult). Different judges may expect different hand positions. Footage courtesy and copyright of KNR Radio Greenland.

Armpit Roll
(Paatip kallua tuermillugu illuinnarmik)

Armpit Roll Video Clip

(1.1MB mpeg) click on image to view clip
Harvey Golden of Qajaq USA performing at 2000 Greenland Championship. For the setup the paddle tip is pressed against your chest near your armpit (but not under your armpit), like the butt of a shotgun. The paddle is swept palm-up. The lift and buoyancy from the extended paddle powers this roll, no hipsnap is necessary. This roll is very useful if you have only the use of one hand and arm (due to injury, entanglement or if you are holding an object in one hand). Footage courtesy and copyright of KNR Radio Greenland.

Vertical Sculling Roll
(Qiperuussineq/paatit ammorluinnnaq)

Vertical Sculling Roll Video Clip

(1.2MB mpeg) click on image to view clip
Maligiaq Padilla of Qajaq Sisimiut. For this maneuver you capsize and recover on the same side. The setup is somewhat similar to the whitewater duffek. Note how Maligiaq's upper palm faces the viewer. The paddle is sculled parallel to the keel with an extreme forward leaning recovery. If the paddle becomes too horizontal (more lift) the judges will disqualify your effort. For the finish, the judges like to see the paddle lifted vertically and quickly out of the water. If you recover by pulling the paddle blade toward you, you may be disqualified. Footage courtesy and copyright of KNR Radio Greenland.

Cross-Arm Roll
(Tallit paarlatsillugit paateqarluni/masikkut)

Cross-Arm Roll Video Clip

(1.2MB mpeg) click on image to view clip
Pavia Tobiassen of Qajaq Nuuk. This is virtually the same roll as the storm roll except, of course, for the arms being crossed. For a capsize on the left, your left arm is placed over your right arm. Like the storm roll, this is a low-brace technique (your palms face the deck) and the inboard paddle blade is levered off the hull during the hip-snap. Footage courtesy and copyright of KNR Radio Greenland.

Under-the-Hull Sculling Roll
(Qaannap ataatigut ipilaarlugu)

Under Hull Sculling Roll Video Clip

(1.5MB mpeg) click on image to view clip
Maligiaq Padilla. This sculling roll starts using a diving paddle angle (leading edge down) that pulls the kayak under and around. Once the paddle passes vertical this diving angle becomes a climbing paddle angle (without any change on your part). Footage courtesy and copyright of KNR Radio Greenland.

Throwing stick roll, Start Forward, Recover Forward
(Assammik masikkut)

Forward Norsaq Roll Video Clip

(531KB mpeg) click on image to view clip
Underwater footage. Cheri Perry of Qajaq USA. The three throwing stick (norsaq) rolls are also performed as hand rolls using the same mechanics. This technique is often considered the most difficult of the three norsaq rolls and requires excellent hamstring flexibility. During the roll you keep your off-hand anchored to the hull and lift your torso away from the deck and rotate slightly to provide purchase with your active hand. A strong hipsnap helps greatly. Footage courtesy of Cheri Perry and David Grainger.

Handrolling with (8kg) Brick
(Ujaqqamik tigumisserluni “masikkut”)

Handroll Holding a Brick Video Clip

(1.4MB mpeg) click on image to view clip
Kristian David Josefsen ("Ari") of Qajaq Nuuk, the men's winner in the 2000 rolling event. During the roll your palm faces upward (as per the same roll without the brick). The weight of the brick makes it more difficult to get your torso near the surface and sweep, and if you aren't upright by the end of the sweep and after your hipsnap, the weight of the brick will pull you back under. Footage courtesy and copyright of KNR Radio Greenland.

Straightjacket Roll
(Tallit paarlatsillugit timaannarmik)

(1.2MB mpeg) click on image to view clip
Cheri Perry of Qajaq USA. This "no-hands" maneuver is the most difficult roll performed in the Greenland competition. You must keep your arms crossed and pressed against your chest for the duration of the maneuver. Cheri demonstrates a powerful hipsnap and fluid movement. Note how she gets her head and torso on the centerline of the aft-deck for a strong recovery. Like most competition rolls, the effort is complete only if you return to the initial starting position as Cheri demonstrates here. Footage courtesy Jay Babina and Cheri Perry.

Walrus Pull
(Nusutsinneq kinngunani iluarisamut)

Walrus Pull Video Clip

(1.5MB mpeg) click on image to view clip
Maligiaq Padilla being pulled sideways by five men on shore as he fights to avoid a capsize. This technique emulates the hunting hazard of being dragged sideways by a harpooned sea mammal in which many men lost their lives. View diagram of setup. This is a very dangerous maneuver, competitors have been injured while performing this both from water pressure and broken paddles. Footage courtesy and copyright of KNR Radio Greenland.


For additional information on Greenland rolling methods please visit the Qajaq USA Rolls &  Rescues page (including the Links).

 

Rope Gymnastics

Qajaasaarneq "like rolling a kayak"

Qajaasaarneq Video Clip

(0.9MB mpeg)  click on image to view clip
This rope gymnastics maneuver is the most similar to rolling a kayak, although the mechanics and feel are quite different. The technique builds strength and flexibility and also teaches independent control of your upper and lower body, all good for improving your kayak roll. Demonstrated by Greg Stamer, Qajaq USA.


Kayak Frame Illustration in Eskimo Life